Utility of CART22-65s and huCART19 in R/R ALL: Noelle V. Frey, MD, MSCE

Video

The associate professor from Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, discussed co-administered CART22-65s and huCART19 in relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

This content originally appeared on our sister site, OncLive.

OncLive spoke with Noelle V. Frey, MD, MSCE, Constance and Sankey Williams Associate Professor, Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, to learn more about the utility of co-administered CART22-65s and huCART19 in relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).

Data from a phase 1 study on the combination were presented at the 63rd Annual American Society of Hematology (ASH) Meeting, December 11-14, 2021.

Investigators found that 2 of the 13 patients infused with CART22-65s and huCART19 developed toxicity before the 28-day assessment, leading 1 to die from therapy-related complications, and the other to develop rapidly progressive disease. However, the 11 patients who were evaluable at the 1-month time point allachieved complete remissions that were minimal residual disease negative, Frey explained.

Overall, the co-administered products were well tolerated; cytokine release syndrome (CRS) and neurotoxicity were observed but manageable, Frey said. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis-like syndrome (HLH) was a unique toxicity attributed to CART22-65s. HLH is clinically distinct from traditional CRS and has been noted in CART22-65s products before, Frey adds. The toxicity was mitigated in the patient who developed HLH, and they were able to continue with a sustained remission, Frey concludes.

Related Videos
Alexandra Gomez Arteaga, MD
Paul Harmatz, MD
Mark Walters, MD
Mitchel Horwitz, MD
Bruce Cree, MD, PhD, MAS, a professor of neurology and the clinical research director of the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Multiple Sclerosis Center
Paul Harmatz, MD
Emilie Aschenbrenner, PharmD, BCOP, a hematology coordinator for pharmacy at Froedtert and the Medical College of Wisconsin
Raj Chovatiya, MD, PhD
Jessica S. Little, MD, a transplant infectious diseases physician at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
© 2024 MJH Life Sciences

All rights reserved.