Dr John Sweetenham Discusses the Impact of CMS' Proposal on Access to CAR T-Cell Therapies

Video

CMS’ proposal that patients be enrolled in a clinical trial or registry to get Medicare coverage for chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies will help improve access, for the most part, but there is the risk that some organizations will choose not to offer this treatment, said John W. Sweetenham, MD, of Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah.

CMS’ proposal that patients be enrolled in a clinical trial or registry to get Medicare coverage for chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies will help improve access, for the most part, but there is the risk that some organizations will choose not to offer this treatment, said John W. Sweetenham, MD, Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah.

Transcript

CMS recently proposed patients be enrolled in a clinical trial or registry to get Medicare coverage for CAR T-cell therapy. Do you think this will help or hinder improving access to these innovative therapies?

I think for the most part, it’s going to help. I think it will mean that, at least initially, I think that these treatments are going to remain under the management of established bone marrow transplant and cell therapy programs. And so, it will enable them to gain more expertise, which I think is important because there is a major learning curve still.

I think the potential downside, as pointed out by Sam Silver, MD, PhD, [of the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center] in the session [Thursday] morning was that with the current coverage determination, some organizations may simply choose not to offer this treatment to their Medicare population because there’s too much money at risk. So, that’s the potential downside.

But, overall, I think that the determination is good, the requirement for evidence is absolutely correct, because we really fully don’t understand the true impact of this treatment yet. So, I think in the sort of short- to medium-term this is a good decision.

Related Videos
George Tachas, PhD, on Tackling DMD Treatment From Multiple Angles
David Suhy, PhD, the cofounder and chief scientific officer of Earli
Deepak L. Bhatt, MD, MPH, MBA, on Incorporating AI into Genetic Research for Cardiovascular Disease
Jeffrey Chamberlain, PhD, on Helping Progress Cell and Gene Therapy Development
Jonathan W. Weinsaft, MD, on Integrating Genetic Research into Cardiovascular Medicine
Jacques Galipeau, MD, on Highlights from ISCT 2024’s Presidential Plenary
Vanee Pho, PhD, the senior director of product management, cell and gene therapy, at Mission Bio
Michael Wang, MD, a professor in the Department of Lymphoma/Myeloma at MD Anderson Cancer Center
Robert J. Hopkin, MD, on Looking Deeper into Fabry Disease Biology
Steven W. Pipe, MD, on Confirming Efficacy, Safety of Hemgenix Gene Therapy in Hemophilia B Populations
© 2024 MJH Life Sciences

All rights reserved.