Dr Reona Sakemura Explains Why Certain Cancers Are More Susceptible to CAR T-Cell Therapy

Bone marrow derived cancer-associated fibroblasts promote tumor progression which can alter a treatment's course, said Reona Sakemura, MD, PhD, postdoctoral researcher at the Mayo Clinic.

Bone marrow derived cancer-associated fibroblasts promote tumor progression which can alter a treatment's course, said Reona Sakemura, MD, PhD, postdoctoral researcher at the Mayo Clinic.

Transcript:

Why are we seeing more success with CAR T-cell therapies in some types of cancer compared with others?

Unlike acute lymphoblastic leukemia, multiple myeloma currently facilitates leukemia or malignant lymphoma. Solid tumors are often protected by the tumor micro environment, especially multiple myeloma. The bone marrow derived cancer-associated fibroblasts not only promote tumor progression, but also impair CAR T-cell functions. So, in our laboratory, we developed the CAR T-cells that target both tumor cells in a tumor microenvironment so it becomes resistant.

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